Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Water Cars

Water is not a fuel, but an energy carrier. Water contains Hydrogen. Hydrogen can be burned in our existing combustible engines. There are inventors working around the world to find efficient ways to release the hydrogen from water. Here is a sample of videos that I have found online.

For those who say water is not efficient and batteries are better. How long do batteries last? What about the materials and possible limits to their widespread adoption? Are they really sustainable? And what about having to build new electric motors and new cars? I'd like to see a way for us to keep our existing infrastructure without throwing it away... I believe water is a good battery and it will be a matter of time until we hit a great breakthrough.

Daniel Dingel:


This is a great story of guy from the Philippines who made a water car conversion 30 years ago. His technology was stopped from the IMF / Worldbank - more reason to get off this debt money system that allows the rich bankers to control our lives. I think he should get over his need for a patent and release the technology free to us online.

Stanley Meyer Pt1:


Stanley Meyer Pt2:


Stanley Meyer's water car from the 90's. He mysteriously died before his technology was to go public and after he had offers from oil companies. His technology generates hydrogen on demand using an advanced form of electrolysis (electricity splits the bonds). The difference is that he uses frequencies to help break apart the H2O bonds.

Ravi's Stanley Meyer replication:


Stanley Meyer's technology was leaked to the public and now many hobbyists are making them in their garages! The last news I heard is that they can generate the hydrogen, but they are having problems with it lasting for a long time or getting the right amounts produced. We'll have to wait and see!! Patience! :)

Burning salt water:


Florida inventor is using radio waves to break apart H2O in salt water and shows that it is burning. This technology uses a lot of energy to burn the water, but it is an example of what is possible.

Japanese Water Car:


Japanese company Genepax has created a water powered car, as reported recently on reuters. The car is electric and the energy is generated through hydrogen from water. There is some speculation of what kind of materials are used to generate the hydrogen, let's hope they are cheap and abundant.

ITM: Plastic Filter Technology:

This company created a plastic filter that would allow the splitting of water to hydrogen. Their hope is to have the hydrogen generated at home, so there is no need for fueling stations. Freedom!

Water Vapor + Hydrogen = Steam Powered Van:

Another variation, this uses compressed hydrogen mixed with water vapour to combust in the engine. There is no mention how or where the compressed hydrogen comes from though.

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